Stressed? Overwhelmed? Sad?

Brianna Sheen

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Pam Midgett, director of Counseling Center, is staged at her desk working on her computer, April 4, in her office in the Counseling Center. Photo by Rachel Johnson

Pam Midgett, director of Counseling Center, is staged at her desk working on her computer, April 4, in her office in the Counseling Center. Photo by Rachel Johnson

Last year, 65 percent of college students reported stress, anxiety or depression as a factor impacting their academic performance, according to the spring 2015 National College Health Assessment.

Similarly, in a survey of MSU students, faculty, staff and alumni, 77.53 percent of people reported experiencing some form of anxiety while in college and 38.2 percent of people reported having been treated for depression in their lifetime.

The correlation between stress and mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression among college students is not a coincidence.

According to Lori Arnold, counselor at the campus Counseling Center, it may be time for students to reach out to family, friends or even the Counseling Center if students see their struggles impacting major areas of their life such as school or personal relationships.

In this series, Wichitan reporters will examine the climate of mental health on campus, delving into root causes of anxiety and depression among MSU students and presenting solutions and resources for those affected.

You’ll hear from Jacklyn York, mass communication junior, who decided to get help for her depression when she discovered she was pregnant following a failed suicide attempt. From Topher McGehee, mass communication freshman, whose depression nearly cost him his life in high school. And from Catherine Stepniak, psychology and sociology junior, who describes her panic disorder as something that’s “always there.”

It’s clear that stress, anxiety or depression affect the majority of people at some point in their lives, but the stigma surrounding mental health remains. It’s time to talk.

View Part 2 of 3 in the series.

 

Depression and anxiety from MWSU Campus Watch on Vimeo.

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