Halloween art reception leads to unique night

Matt Jobe

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Cara Mack, math senior, takes a photo of Lucia Trejo, exercise physiology senior, in front of photgraphs taken by Gary Goldberg at the Faculty Art Exhibit on Oct. 31. Photo by Ethan Metcalf.

Cara Mack, math senior, takes a photo of Lucia Trejo, exercise physiology senior, in front of photgraphs taken by Gary Goldberg at the Faculty Art Exhibit on Oct. 31. Photo by Ethan Metcalf.

Art students and faculty unveiled two exhibits Oct. 31, with pieces from Kappa Pi, the art honor society, on display in the Juanita Harvey Foyer, while faculty work was put in the main gallery. Many artists and attendees dressed in costumes to celebrate spooky coincidence of the reception.

“It’s always a little magical,” said Ann Leimer, associate art professor and chair of the department.

Leimer said displaying the student and faculty work in adjacent galleries created a nice separation.

“Really, seeing the two rooms, you get a good look at what both sides of the school are doing,” Leimer said. “Resident artists bring a lot of diversity. The exhibit shows off a lot of different mediums, and different styles. There is something for everyone.”

Suguru Hiraide is an associate professor who is known for his work with metal and kinetic sculpture, which involves one or more parts of a sculpture to be in motion, either mechanically or when powered by an outside source.

“Traditionally sculptures are not moveable,” Hiraide said, “But a few years ago artists started to experiment with ways to keep it interesting. I like to add movement, depending on the piece.”

For this style to be effective, however, Hiraide said every piece must be cut and measured precisely. Gary Goldberg, art professor and gallery director, said Hiraide’s work “looks like it came out of a German automobile factory.”

Hiraide’s favorite part of the exhibit was not his work, but being able to see the work of his students.

“It’s exciting, I get to see their developments. It’s an excellent opportunity to see them as a working artist, see what motivates them as well as seeing them exploring styles they weren’t comfortable with before,” Hiraide said.

Leimer adds, “Students get to see what it’s like to go into that field as a professional artist. They get to see what their life could be like if they pursue this passion.”

Royce Brock, art senior and member of Kappa Pi, had two pieces on display in the exhibit, but he said he was more interested in looking at all the art students and attendees in Halloween costumes.

“It’s nice to have pieces on display, but it’s not surreal. Seeing all the costumes was the best part of the show,” Brock said.

Almost everyone who showed up was in costume, and Leimer said it lightened the mood tremendously.

“Seeing all of these students attending and having a great time, that’s a huge highlight for me,” Leimer said.

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