Constitution Day serves to raise awareness of founding document

Herbert McCullough

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Mahogany Braxton nursing freshman reads a constution pamphlet while waiting to hand them out. "The 2nd amendment is my favorite amendment is my favorite because it gives you a chance to protect yourself." September 16, Photo by Topher McGehee

Mahogany Braxton, nursing freshman, reads a  pamphlet while waiting to hand them out. “The Second Amendment is my favorite amendment is my favorite because it gives you a chance to protect yourself.” Photo by Topher McGehee

Linda Veazey, associate professor of political science, along with her freshmen students, hosted Constitution Day events Sept. 16 to celebrate the ratification of the United States Constitution in 1787.

Although technically Constitution Day is Sept. 17, Veazey’s freshmen class passed out copies of the Constitution in both English and Spanish. Students who received a copy could to show their copy in the Student Government Office to receive a free T-shirt. 

Veazey explained the event further.

“This was the first time that we have been involved with the Student Development and Orientation Office to do Constitution Day so for our first time event, I think it went great,” Veazey said.

Veazey explained they had two learning communities along with the learning community of 20 students she shared with Kristen Garrison, writing program administrator, and Brandy Jollif-Scott, political science assistant professor, and Melissa Nivens, English lecturer. Veazey said she was excited to have 40 students involved and handing out the Constitutions, walking around campus with their shirts, and informing people about Constitution Day.

Veazey reflected on the numbers of total students who attended the event.

“I’m not sure. I don’t have a count student development might have a better idea,” Veazey said.

She further explained the importance of Constitution Day.

“Constitution Day is important because we should celebrate our constitution. We were the first country to have this amazing document and celebrating it on Sept. 17th every year helps us remember why it’s so important that we have rights in this country and that we’re a government ruled by laws and not people. And it’s our constitution that is the supreme law of the land and so for students, one of the great things that we can learn about it. We gave out pocket constitutions because every American should be able to know their rights and be able to read the constitution,” Veazey said.

A voters’ registration drive next sponsored by the League of Women’s Voters of Wichita Falls was also present. Kaye Holland, a debutant from Wichita Falls, explained the importance of voting.

“Because if you don’t vote, you don’t have a voice,” Holland said. “And if you don’t vote, someone else will vote for you.”

This event expressed the significance of understanding one’s rights as an American citizen according to students. One of Veazey’s students, Austin Underwood, undecided freshman, explained that Constitution Day is simply “to raise awareness of the Constitution and to inform people of their rights.”

Braeden Alves mechanical engineering freshman discusses voter registration with the League of Woman Voters representatives. "I love America because the freedom to vote and of course free mints!" Spetember 16, Photo by Topher McGehee

Braeden Alves, mechanical engineering freshman, discusses voter registration with the League of Woman Voters representatives. “I love America because the freedom to vote and of course free mints!” Photo by Topher McGehee

Veazey expanded on the topic.

“Because we can know our rights. In a lot of countries, you don’t have rights. The Constitution is a founding document of our country. Because of it, we are a country of laws and not of one man rule,” Veazey said.

According to Veazey, the goal of this event — including viewing the HBO Documentary Citizen USA: 50 State Road Trip — was to understand the Constitution and to educate both students and faculty members their rights as Americans outlined in it.

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