A day in the life: Chelcie Kizart

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Ever since many of us were little, we have imagined and dreamed about the day we would graduate from our dream school pursuing our dream occupation. The overwhelming emotions fill our bodies as we proudly walk across the stage and hold the diploma closely to our bodies. The smile on our faces couldn’t get any wider as we slowly move our tassels from the right to the left side of the cap representing the true beginning of our lives. After four years of dedication, Chelcie Kizart, sports and leisure studies senior, is preparing for her new journey as a new grad.

“My college experience has been eye-opening. After spending four years being a student-athlete and transitioning between schools and states, I have learned a lot about myself during this journey,” Kizart said. “Though it’s been a hectic experience, I wouldn’t trade it for the world and I can’t wait to embark on this new adventure.”

Kizart started her college career in an entirely new atmosphere moving 11 hours and 32 minutes away from home in Minnesota to County Community College in Concordia, Kansas. She dedicated her life to being a part of a team and used her leadership skills developed on the basketball court to help her throughout her first two years. After two years, Kizart transferred to Midwestern State University leading the basketball team to many victories as a point guard.

“Being so far away from home affected me differently because it was so much harder than just being a few hours away,” Kizart said. “I can’t just go home and see my parents or hang out with my family and neither can they just come here and see me. I always have to plan ahead and make sure that I have the money to be able to pay for traveling expenses and throughout college, I have struggled with being so far from home.”

Kizart said she has faced several challenges outside of being separated from home.

“Mentally I was stable throughout college, but I have gone through forms of mild depression. Though the hardest challenge was pulling all-nighters either doing homework or studying for a test which definitely added additional stress,” Kizart said.

Despite being so far away from them, Kizart still describes her family as being her number one supporter and credits them for also being one of the main reasons she wanted to complete college in four years.

“My family has been the greatest support system since I have been in college, they continuously remind me of how proud they are of me and that always has motivated me throughout my college career,” Kizart said.

Kizart said that college has not only been an eye-opener but a learning experience and she tackled on her own.

“College has definitely helped shape me into the woman I am today,” Kizart said. “I have learned how to ask for help because in college it is so hard to get behind in your classes. I also have learned the hard way about friends and that some friendships are meant to experience change.”

Despite Kizart having faced many challenges, she has overcome those barriers blocking her from success, and she said she feels nothing but excitement to be graduating in the spring.

“It feels great to be graduating in the spring, I’ve worked so hard to get where I am today and I can’t be anything but proud of myself for all of my accomplishments in these past four years.”

Once she graduates, Kizart said she plans to permanently move back home to Minnesota and become a coach so that she can impact the lives of athletes the way her coaches impacted her life. Although she is ready to embark on her new journey of life, she said she will truly miss being on the court and the people she has made those life-long relationships with.

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