Blood drive yields average response

Jacklyn York

Jase Keister, criminal justice freshman, laughs at the Texas Blood Institute blood drop mascot while giving blood in Comanche suite, Jan, 26, 2016. Photo by Francisco Martinez
Jase Keister, criminal justice freshman, laughs at the Texas Blood Institute blood drop mascot while giving blood in Comanche suite, Jan, 26, 2016. Photo by Francisco Martinez

Food court smells may have been drawing in lunch guests, while nearby volunteers from the Residence Hall Association, were drawing in a decent size crowd as well, signing the public up to save three lives for every pint of blood they donated.

Sam Metzler, business freshman, sat behind the sign in sheet for the blood drive “I donated blood yesterday and I feel great today,” with a big grin and two thumbs up.

Nearby, Institute staff members administrated free health screenings to eliminate potential donors with abnormal blood pressure, high cholesterol or unsafe iron levels.

Jennifer Risinger, accounts aanager of the Texas Blood Institute, said, “Our iron level standards are higher than routine doctor visits.”

Risinger said one donor was surprised to see that she was able to donate blood after her doctor told her several years ago that she was anemic.

“Iron levels can change daily and we wouldn’t allow anyone to donate that doesn’t have an iron level of 38 or higher,” Risinger said.

Yesterday more than 45 donors had signed up or walked in to donate blood, which Topher McGehee, business management freshman and member of RHA, said was an average response.

Estefani Villar, dental hygiene freshman, takes in a deep breath as a phlebotomist inserts a needle to draw blood in the Comanche suite, Jan, 26, 2016. Photo by Francisco Martinez
Estefani Villar, dental hygiene freshman, takes in a deep breath as a phlebotomist inserts a needle to draw blood in the Comanche suite, Jan, 26, 2016. Photo by Francisco Martinez

“This drive wasn’t advertised but it has been a good turn out,” said McGehee.

Clint Coulter, director of Office of Residence Life for Pierce Hall, said, “ The holiday break played a factor with marketing as well as managing available space with other events going on as well.”

Coulter said it is all about encouraging community activities, and hosting an event such as a blood drive at little to no cost to the university.

Christian Evans, nursing freshman, said, “It’s inspiring! I really didn’t expect many people to take time out of thier busy days to donate blood but I’ve been surprised. When I look at the sign in sheet and see 50 people, I think that’s 150 children saved.”

Inside Comanche, licensed phlebotomists, a person trained to collect blood for medical reasons, managed four medical beds were managed by and refreshments were available.

Estafani DelVillar, dental hygiene freshman, sat alone while waiting for a bed to become available.

“I began donating blood after my father was in a terrible accident and required blood to live as well as an infant cousin that was born premature,” DelVillar said.

She has received a letter of thanks from a friend after discovering her child would need blood. This was the fourth time Delvillar donated.

The blood drive continues Thursday Jan. 28, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Clark Student Center Comanche Suites.