Enrollment growth key

Economic development | Enrollment | Budget | Nursing | Housing | International enrollment | Crime | Greek life

Screen Shot 2015-11-30 at 11.44.50 AM

Over the last seven years, MSU has seen an increase in racial diversity particularly showing an increase in Hispanic students. Of the COPLAC schools, MSU was one of the most racially diverse. “As we go forward in time were going to look more like Dallas and more like throughout the state of Texas. Within the next 10 to 15 years, we have a chance to be classified as a Hispanic-serving institution which would open up Title V federal funds. That’s a pretty good goal.  We need to serve the population of Texas.” SOURCE: MSU Office of Institutional Research

Over the last seven years, MSU has seen an increase in racial diversity particularly showing an increase in Hispanic students. Of the COPLAC schools, MSU was one of the most racially diverse. “As we go forward in time were going to look more like Dallas and more like throughout the state of Texas. Within the next 10 to 15 years, we have a chance to be classified as a Hispanic-serving institution which would open up Title V federal funds. That’s a pretty good goal. We need to serve the population of Texas.” SOURCE: MSU Office of Institutional Research

While universities across Texas have seen unprecedented growth over the last decade, MSU peaked in 2010, a result, officials say, of a combination of factors including enrollment standards and the economy.

Over the next few years — decades — all of the changes at the university from students services to faculty/staff salaries to new buildings are dependent on enrollment growth.

Marilyn Fowlé, vice president of business affairs and finance, said, “If you grow enrollment then you have more money. You’ve got more students paying the same amount but you’ve got more of them so that’s our strategy for now, is to grow enrollment. You’ve got all of these costs that are the same no matter if you have 2,000 students or 6,000 students. Obviously it’s better to have the 6,000 students and cover those costs.”

The composition of the students attending MSU for the first time is also changing with more students taking advanced classes in high school.

“In time we will get more of those students because students in high school are starting to take more and more of these classes. Now were getting more and more freshmen every year who are sophomores,” he said.

The growth also means changes on campus as fewer students commute to campus and more live on campus.

“We’re becoming a residential campus. Residential population is exploding,” Lamb said. And he said this means providing more campus services from dining to counseling.

Lamb said when he looked at where these students were coming from, clearly more were coming from outside the Wichita Falls area. To pursue even more students from the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex, the admissions office hired Adam Pitts to work full-time recruiting students in that area.

Most of the students that aren’t from the Wichita Falls area are coming from the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Reporting by Amy Portillo