Celebration of Scholarship ‘a good learning experience’

Celebration of Scholarship Special Edition from MWSU Campus Watch on Vimeo.

The research and creativity of students and professors were in the spotlight during the fourth annual Celebration of Scholarship in the Clark Student Center April 28-30.

AWARD RECIPIENTS

  • 1st Best Oral Presentation | Elliot Gibson, Brandon Helms, Emily Herzog and James Wood for “A Dual Rotor Wind Turbine Design.” Faculty mentor: Salim Azzouz, McCoy School of Engineering, College of Science and Mathematics.
  • 2nd Best Oral Presentation | Johnny Blevins, Makenzie Johnson, Clark O’Connor and Tyler Thomas for “Telemetry Data Collection from a Wind Turbine and a Photovoltaic Solar Panel. Faculty Mentor: Salim Azzouz, McCoy School of Engineering, College of Science and Mathematics.
  • 3rd Best Oral Presentation | Mo Alkassar and Caleb Born for “Student Retention at DCOBA.” Faculty mentor: Thuy Nguyen, Department of Marketing, Dillard College of Business Administration.
  • 1st Best Poster Presentation | Andrew Skinner for “A Survey of Aquatic Insect Diversity along the Wichita River.” Faculty member: Roy Vogtsberger, Department of Biology, College of Science and Mathematics.
  • 2nd Best Poster Presentation | Michael Arthur Olaya for “Project Airship: Near Difference Vegetation Index Aerial Imaging.” Faculty mentor: Yu Guo, McCoy School of Engineering, College of Science and Mathematics.
  • 3rd Best Poster PresentationTie: Xitong Li and Huiuo Chen for “Recognition of Shapes in a Prototype Robot Vision System.” Faculty mentor: Yu Guo, McCoy School of Engineering, College of Science and Mathematics and Christian Esquivel for “Comparison of caloric content between tropical milkweed (Asclepias currassavicae) and native temperature milkweed (Asclepias sp.): Implication for Monarch Butterfly conservation.” Faculty mentor: Charles M. Watson, Department of Biology, College of Science and Mathematics.
  • Most Original and Creative Project | Michael Arthur Olaya for “Project Airship: Near Difference Vegetation Index Aerial Imaging.” Faculty mentor: Yu Guo, McCoy School of Engineering, College of Science and Mathematics.
  • Most Interdisciplinary Project | Meaghan Rose for “Alien Extremophiles: The Possibilities of Extraterrestrial Life.” Faculty Sponsor: Magaly Rincón-Zachary, Department of Biology, College of Science and Mathematics.

QUOTATIONS

Bridget Alaniz, biology senior, listens to Jeff Snowden's, geology senior, presentation about sealevel changes through comparing mineral fossil composition from samples in Oklahoma, at the undergraduate research poster presentation part during the Celebration of Scholarships, Thursday, April 30, 2015. Photo by Rachel Johnson "I presented last year, so I was already interested  to come out, plus my biology teacher offered extra credit for it, so I had multiple reasons to come out here," Alaniz said. Photo by Rachel Johnson.

Bridget Alaniz, biology senior, listens to Jeff Snowden’s, geology senior, presentation about sealevel changes through comparing mineral fossil composition from samples in Oklahoma, at the undergraduate research poster presentation part during the Celebration of Scholarship, April 30. “I presented last year, so I was already interested to come out, plus my biology teacher offered extra credit for it, so I had multiple reasons to come out here,” Alaniz said. Photo by Rachel Johnson.

Mo Alkassar, marketing and finance junior, presenter: “Addressing Student Retention at the Dillard College of Business Administration”: “The main goal of our project was to use exploratory and descriptive research to find the underlying factors behind the decrease in retention rates in the Dillard College of Business. I personally choose to do this project because it will differentiate us among the various students at Dillard. It will give us more experience to do research and present and give us a chance to improve our presentation skills. And we will share more knowledge to the professors here and the dean. Our ultimate goal is to get students to graduate from Midwestern State University with more confidence in their careers and  in their respective fields of study. We believe in the value behind the research.”

Caleb Born, marketing senior, presenter: “Addressing Student Retention at the Dillard College of Business Administration”: “Mainly we were trying to close that gap between the U.S. national average and then what we have, because we did see an increase but like we said, it leveled off. We now found what we believe to be the underlying reasons of the retention issue and so we’ve discussed the solutions that we have, but next semester we’re hoping to take it further, and do more survey’s based on what more people are receptive towards as far as these changes. It was a learning experience as we formed these ideas and discovered these conclusions that we have. We hope that our project is a benefit to the university of some sort, especially moving forward.”

John Tucker, history senior, presenter: “Notes from Underground” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky: “I have been to two very academic conferences and here I was on my home turf, so it was a really nice send-off to comfortably explain my project on my home-ground. That was really nice, and to be evaluated by actual people, rather than my peers, obviously people in there are older and much more knowledgeable than I am. I don’t think I would have done anything differently. I think this was a nice conclusion to this project alone and it leaves me with the ambition and a desire to pursue further projects. It’s a nice affirmation – I’ve come to the end of it, I’ve done it, people have asked me questions about and I feel like I really understand it. I’ve added to the corpus of knowledge, and it’s really just a reaffirmation that I can pursue other things. It is really nice to get other people to question my mode of logic, my mode of thinking, to question the entire system that I use. Ultimately my work is meaningless without these criticisms and being able to back up my assertions. It’s nice to have that, especially among my peers who are engaging in the same kind of projects as I am.”

Camille Shepherd, assessment specialist and evaluator: “So far the celebration has been great because it’s about twice the size as usual. We’ve involved students or faculty from more colleges than ever before. This is also the first time where students and faculty from every single college are involved and have something to present.”

Newman Wong, research analyst and evaluator: “I’m excited to find some interesting things, something new and different.”

Michael Winters, sociology senior, presenter: “Motherfuckery”: “The reason I’m studying this is, because it’s a new study in social sciences. There are a lot of hackers, and this gives more understanding of why this is an issue, and it’s hard to get accurate data. Pure social interaction, action and consequence. Sociological Inquiry. I want people to learn first of all, the way we in frame things, but we need to see the larger consequence of their actions. Motherfuckery is a key phrase they use and how they present themselves, and scare off these kind of people. That’s why it’s to be called that.”

Maegan Thurston, radiology sophomore, EURECA presentation: “It is important for pre-service teachers  to know how to integrate reading into math for elementary kids, the benefits include that it conserves time, improves test scores, and improves language and communication skills. Its really easy to teach this way especially when using books like ‘Alphie the Alligator’ to show math concepts with pictures and a story.”

Will Statham, mechanical engineering junior: “Project Airship: Near Difference Vegetation Index Aerial Imaging was my favorite poster to see. It showed how he used 3D printing, made a circuit board, and modified a camera so that it can be used to help crop development.”

Michael Winters, presenter: “Ultracoordinated Motherfuckery”: “It is over the hacking group Anonymous. I grew up on the internet and groups like this really just sparked my interest and how it was going to affect the social sciences.”

Jessyca Wagner, faculty mentor to all 10 of the radiology poster projects: “This is a good learning experience for them. We’re always needing more research in the radiology program.”

Martin Melhus, faculty mentor to Matt Aaron and “CUDA Program for Simulation of Granular Flow”: “The end goal was me forwarding my research,” said Martin Melhus, physics assistant professor and EUREKA faculty mentor. “And for him to forward his education.”

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